Indeterminacy, Some Project Notes


John Cage’s Sonata and Interludes for Prepared Piano

Visual Sound (Pink Sedum) for Prepared Pasta Maker

About AnnIsikArts

Artist/Writer/Blogger
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8 Responses to Indeterminacy, Some Project Notes

  1. Suzanne says:

    . I discovered this post after the one about liminal space. I used to listen to music like this way back in the 70s. My late husband was composer and created similar pieces.
    I like the way the Cage composition melds into the background sounds here right now – wind in the trees, birds singing intermittently. At the same time I find some of the more dramatic flourishes put me on edge. (Pretty much how they used to in the 70s – that’s a purely personal observation rather than any kind of critique of the music).

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    • AnnIsikArts says:

      Sorry, just seen your lovely comments. WordPress isn’t putting the orange dot next to the bell symbol on my screen anymore, for some reason. You’re clearly really musical. I hadn’t known your husband was a composer. You will have been surrounded by music constantly and developed quite an ‘ear’. I understand what you say about the discordant aspects. I like the idea of adapting musical instruments to introduce entirely new sounds. At uni some works I made for my degree show included paintings/collages made on the back of the stretched canvas, thus inside the back of the canvas. The wood frame exposed, I nailed string across, which cast shadows on the work. I added some razor shells which moved and clattered together when pushed. I tried to record the sound but all I got was traffic noise from outside my studio window. In hindsight, I should have included the recordings traffic noise and all. I was thinking of adding some guitar ‘pegs’ and stretching wires across. I didn’t have the courage to go that abstract. I’ve had the urge to make some works like this at various times since. Maybe I should follow that ‘poetic path’ now. Maybe I’m a reincarnation of Stradivarius. 🙂

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      • Suzanne says:

        WordPress doesn’t always show me the orange dot either these days.
        I don’t know about me beng musical. I appreciate music though I have no formal training.
        I’m fascinated by the student work you describe – what a fabulous idea – visual music.
        Going completely abstract is challenging. I get so tied into imagery. It’s interesting that Kandinsky – the father of abstract painting – related his art so srongly with music. There is a definite correlation between the two in the abstract realms. Interesting too that Kandinsky saw his art as spiritual.
        I’m off to have a look at your latest blog post now. 🙂

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      • AnnIsikArts says:

        I tried to respond to this on my iPhone last night – or rather early this morning. I don’t know if you got it or if I fell asleep before I got to send it! Anyway, I’ll repeat myself and hope if you got the previous one, I don’t contradict myself here! It is said that Kandinsky had his epiphany about his work that led into abstraction when his housekeeper accidentally turned one of his paintings upside down when cleaning. The Great Creator works in strange ways. I have Kandinsky’s little book: Concerning the Spiritual in Art. I’ll have to dig it out.

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      • Suzanne says:

        Now it’s my turn to be tired and on my tablet. I read bits of Kandinsky’s book when I was in art school but can’t remember much of it now apart from his colour theories. I do like his early paintings though. 😊

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      • AnnIsikArts says:

        If I find anything in his book on spirituality and art that might interest you, I’ll pass it on.

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  2. Saw this on my phone first and was impressed with the image created. Had no idea what pink sedum was and looked it up, I was disappointed the post was so short …

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