Mystery Solved


Reminder of Cornwall 6 October 2014I meant to send out a plea – and forgot – to anybody out there who could identify the landscape in this plaque A Reminder of Cornwall.

My unspoken plea was picked up telepathically and I now know it’s a place called Carn Brea, Cornwall – confirmed by the photo below (Tony Atkin, courtesy Geograph).

It was identified by Fellow Friday Fictioneer Draliman physicist and computer programming buccaneer who lives in … Cornwall.

Now, can anyone identify the lady in the photo? Or even the cow, an equally elegant lady, in her own cowish way? Clues: (one) written on the back of the photo is: Sent with Pat’s Love; and (two) this little piece of memorabilia was found in Rochester, Kent.

(c) Tony Atkin  Carn Brea Hill from the east for SW6840 (Licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence)

(c) Tony Atkin
Carn Brea Hill from the east for SW6840
(Licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence)

Carn Brea is on a hill less than two miles from Redruth and dates back to a Neolithic settlement (3,700-3,400 b.c.) During the Iron Age, the hillside was mined for minerals. There is also a castle, dating back to medieval times and the Ford Anglia used in the Harry Potter films, which had been stolen, mysteriously turn up there in 2006.

Thanks again, Draliman, your vision is truly laser-like.  (Ouch! That’s a private joke, or rather, pun).

Ann

About AnnIsikArts

Artist/Writer, Proofreader/Copy Editor
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17 Responses to Mystery Solved

  1. Sarah Ann says:

    Good luck finding out who the women in the photo are – stranger things have happened. All you need is for the one on the left (as you look at it) to be a prize-winning cow….

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Solomon, A. 1992. Gender, Representation, and Power in San Ethnography and Rock Art. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology. 11: 291-329. 🙂

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  3. draliman says:

    You’re welcome 🙂 Love the pun!
    I can’t help with the other photo, I’m afraid 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ha! I was going to say somewhere round Camborne or Redruth! Went up on Carn Brea a long, long time ago.

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    • AnnIsikArts says:

      Ah synchronicity, how it brings folks together – whether believed in or not. I love your Asger Jorn quote: “Ornament exists as an objective reality in the smallest particles of matter and forms the basis for the subjective pleasure mankind experiences in ornament, which is simply the grammar of matter, the mathematics of material.”

      In fact, your ‘About’ article raised the hairs on my arms. I am going to soak up your blog like a parched radium atom. May I reblog this article?

      P S I was acquainted at one time with the lovely and humble Stan Beckensall who I would say was largely responsible as an amateur rock art ‘hound’ for the discovery of rock art in Northumberland. I have a couple of his little books from way back.

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      • Yes! Of course you can reblog it! Your praise brought tears to my eyes, thank you.
        Synchronicity, ‘meaningful coincidence’, call it what you will… it definitely makes life more interesting.

        I’ve got a couple of SB’s books, though sadly I’ve not met him.

        Thanks again,

        Simon

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      • AnnIsikArts says:

        I have a theory about cup ‘n ring markings: that they would have been used ritually paired with some kind of rod, for the same purpose as the linga/yoni of the Hindu religion, as the “indivisible two-in-oneness of male and female, the passive space and active time from which all life originates” (ref: Wipipedia – I know, not academic). If the ‘linga’ were of wood, that would explain why today there is no evidence to back up my theory. It will remain ‘poetic’. 🙂

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      • Certainly not beyond the bounds of possibility. Without having the references to hand, I’ve read that c&r marks with a groove leading to/from the central cupule have been ascribed a ‘yonic’ significance, even as diagrams of passage graves – which have tomb/womb associations of their own.

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      • AnnIsikArts says:

        That’s very interesting. I’ll google ‘yonic signigicance’. 🙂

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      • AnnIsikArts says:

        I mean, ‘yonic significance’!

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      • I don’t know how much luck you’ll have, as I was using ‘yonic’ euphemistically! I’ll try and track down the article.

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      • This is what I was thinking of (I’ll look up the Solomon ref now!)

        A similar gendered spatialisation is noted by Solomon in the iconography of the Australian Walbiri , where a circle is feminine and may represent various things, including female genitalia and the waterhole, as well as an access point to other worlds (Munn 1986, in Solomon 1992:303). The formal similarity of the symbol of the point with concentric circles in Walbiri art to the cup-and-ring form may suggest a similar range of possible meanings (Jackson 1995:402-403). One meaning offered in the Walbiri motif is that it denotes the connecting path between the male and the female. In another situation, the point becomes the water-hole or specific place which is the link between this world and that of the ancestors’ dream world, the exit and entrance being via the water hole, or the centre of the form (ibid.:403).

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      • AnnIsikArts says:

        Thank you so much for this. It reminded me that I have had a book: Australian Aboriginal Paintings, by Jennifer Isaacs, for over 20 years. I took it down from my shelf. The front cover is a bit of a painting by Sonda Turner Sampitjinpa. It’s called ‘Women’s Fire Ceremony’. It’s a dot painting with concentric circles some joined by a long wavy band of 4 rows of dots. I had not made the connection till now between cup and ring markings and this type of art. Startlingly, however, I recalled having intuitively decorated, in just such a way, some time in the 90s, the interior of a papier mache cast of the object I always refer to as my ‘linga’. Alas I painted this out as I couldn’t make sense of it. I only recall I was trying to do some sort of mapping. This has added some new ‘vocabulary’ to my ongoing project ‘Below the Line’. Thank you for that! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Glad to be of help!

        Funny how certain things emerge at particular times or assume their full significance years after they appeared.

        Liked by 1 person

      • AnnIsikArts says:

        It has many names, this phenomenon and the only one that isn’t valid is ‘coincidence’! Thanks again and I look forward to reading your blog. I was about to make a page of blogs I like and will add yours, definitely. 🙂

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      • AnnIsikArts says:

        Yes, it’s a phenomenon I’ve noticed, too. Also, the significance can change over time without either being ‘wrong’!

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