Friday Fictioneers 100 Word Flash Fiction Story: Reminder


(c) Kent Bonham 2014

(c) Kent Bonham 2014

Every Friday authors worldwide gather round the virtual fireside of Rochelle Wisoff and share stories of 100 words, prompted by a common photograph, and exchange constructive criticism. Readers’ comments are also welcome. This week’s photo has been provided by Kent Bonham. Thanks, Kent. Your photo inspired the following very late entry from me this week.

Reminder

“Found something?”
That was Tod. We were in a junk shop, hunting for stuff to ‘upcycle’.
“Plaque.” I showed him.
“‘Reminder of Cornwall,’” he read out loud. It was printed beneath a postcard. To its right was a slot for a photo.
“Strange – a well-groomed woman in a tailored fifties dress and heels standing ankle deep in grass stroking a cow’s nose.”
“Cow’s tailored, too.”
“The background …”
“Tailored?”
“Same view as postcard.” I took out, flipped the photo. “With Pat’s love. What’ve you found?”
“Pod. Mysterious remains of …?”
“Life. Same as mine.”
“You gonna upcycle it?”
How?

(c) Ann Isik 2014
100 words

Reminder of Cornwall 6 October 2014

About AnnIsikArts

Artist/Writer, Proofreader/Copy Editor
This entry was posted in Dialogue, Short Story Writing, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Friday Fictioneers 100 Word Flash Fiction Story: Reminder

  1. anca says:

    oooh, what a concept this idea of flash fiction is! sounds like such an intriguing challenge!

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    • AnnIsikArts says:

      Try it! Friday Fictioneers is a very supportive and diverse group and it’s a great discipline. You have to be succinct to construct a complete story in only 100 words. There are poets too. I sometimes am inspired to write a poem to the photo prompt. Ann

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  2. draliman says:

    The “Reminder of Cornwall” looks like Carn Brea to me…

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    • AnnIsikArts says:

      Spot on! Carn Brea it is! I was wondering how on earth you came up with that then checked your ‘About’ page again and … you live in Cornwall. Now, you don’t know who ‘Pat’ might be, do you? No, I don’t suppose so. Thank you. I’m going to post a little blog with my plaque and a photo of Carn Brea and a link to your blog. Thank you. Ann

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  3. wmqcolby says:

    Ann, I have NO idea how you got what you got from my picture, but I really do like this story! The conversation flows pretty well, very natural. You had told me about your dialogue in my comments section. You have a decent ear for it. The other pics are good, too. Very good inspiration.
    Can you give me a little more on the inference with the pod? I thought it fascinating.
    Nice job!

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    • AnnIsikArts says:

      Thanks for the comments Kent. Well, you asked for it! Follows the ‘long and winding road of my mind’! I saw the thing on the stick as the remains of something. It looks like a large seed pod. While pondering (I always try to download on Wednesdays and let the image sort of float around in the hope it will ‘talk’ to me about itself). A day or so later I came across the plaque with the woman’s photo and postcard of somewhere in Cornwall. I am always hunting in charity shops for stuff to ‘upcycle’ into art – I do mixed media/encaustic/altered books type stuff. When I spotted that the background in the photo of the woman and cow was the same as the postcard, I was intrigued. I also was intrigued that she was so smartly dressed to be standing with a cow in a field. I felt she might have been on her honeymoon. I was also sad that this photo had ended up in a charity shop and on sale for £1.99. When I sat down to write the story, I knew there was a connection between your photo and ‘mine’. Maybe it was that I saw the ‘pod’ as ‘remains’ and under the postcard was ‘Reminder of Cornwall’. Odd, that, as normally, it would have read ‘Souvenir’, but I think my object was probably home made. So, both your photo and my object were ‘memento mori’, reminders of death. Memento mori were objects painted into Dutch 17th century still lifes, such as skulls or dead birds/animals to remind people to be aware of their final destinations. Cheerful, I know. So as I began to write, my two characters turned up ‘replaying’ my finding of the plaque in the charity shop. I know I won’t be able to destroy this plaque by whiting it out, which explains the last word: “How?” How could I create something more beautiful than this moment in someone’s life – who is likely to have passed away now. So I’m stuck with a photo of someone I have no connection with at all, other than as in this plaque. Phew! Hope you made it out of my mind! 🙂

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  4. Dear Ann,

    Upcycle is a new term for me. My imagination usually goes wild when I look at old photos of people I don’t know. Who were they? How did they relate to each other? An on and on. Your story reflects that.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    • AnnIsikArts says:

      Thanks Rochelle. Yes, ‘upcycling’ is a new phenomenon. From Wikipedia: Upcycling … converting waste materials or useless products into new materials or products of better quality or for better environmental value. It makes me sad to see ‘cast aside’ photos of people. I found the one in the story in my local Oxfam charity shop. I was going to white everything out and ‘upcycle’ it into art, but can’t! How can I ‘white out’ something as precious as a life – have the arrogance to suppose I can upcycle it into something more valuable? I’m stuck with it now – a photo of a complete stranger!

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  5. Sarah Ann says:

    Hmm, how do you up-cycle that pod? Now there’s another story 🙂

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    • AnnIsikArts says:

      I could probably upcycle the pod, but I won’t be able to upcycle the ‘Reminder’ which I really did buy the other day in a local charity shop. Old photos make me sad.I commented on it as I was paying, to the shop volunteer. He said they were given a lot of books one day and in the middle were a whole bunch of family albums and stuff, but had no way to return them.

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