The Blue’n Orange Persuasion of the Green Witch


Boardwalk  (c) Adam Ickes

Boardwalk
(c) Adam Ickes

Every Friday authors worldwide gather around the virtual fireside of Rochelle Wisoff and share stories of 100 words, prompted by a common photograph, and exchange constructive criticism. Readers’ comments are also welcome. This week’s photo has been provided by Adam Ickes.

Thank you Adam.

Here’s the story Adam’s photo inspired.

The Blue’n Orange Persuasion of the Green Witch

“Who’s down the end of the boardwalk, Granpa?”
“What d’you see, son?”
“Little girl, white dress; cradling …”
“ … alligator. That be Bee, boy.”
“Bee?”
“Essie Bee.”
“There’s a black girl there now, Granpa.”
“Cropped hair? Bonifay. Wanders the swamp.”
“It’s an old woman.”
“Black dress, straw hat?”
I nodded, squinting up at him.
“Those three be manfesashuns o t’Green Witch. Lookin’ t’carry away boys t’torture’n eat. Her persuasion’s the blue’n orange morelty.”
I remember Granpa’s face in silhouette, shielding me from the sun, the Manfesashuns and the Blue n’Orange Morality. From that day I stuck to the black’n white.

(c) Ann Isik
100 Words

About AnnIsikArts

Artist/Writer, Proofreader/Copy Editor
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33 Responses to The Blue’n Orange Persuasion of the Green Witch

  1. I’m not from the Gulf States, but it seems to me that your dialogue is spot-on (if I’m reading the setting correctly), and that’s hard to pull off successfully. Plus, offering a compelling story in a “century” of words! I love the folk tale/supernatural aspect, too. All in all, a great read (and thanks for stopping by and reading my Friday Fictioneers post; I have a feeling our setting locations might be similar on this one)!

    Like

  2. I’m not from the Gulf States, but it seems to me that your dialogue is spot-on (if I’m reading the setting correctly), and that’s hard to pull off successfully. Plus, offering a compelling story in a “century” of words! I love the folk tale/supernatural aspect, too. All in all, a great read (and thanks for stopping by and reading my Friday Fictioneers post; I have a feeling our setting locations are similar)!

    Like

  3. I’m not from the Gulf States, but it seems to me that your dialogue is spot-on (if I’m reading the setting correctly), and that’s hard to pull off successfully. Plus, offering a compelling story in a “century” of words! I love the folk tale/supernatural aspect, too. All in all, a great read (and thanks for stopping by and reading my Friday Fictioneers post; I have a feeling our setting locations are similar)!

    Like

    • AnnIsikArts says:

      I just made up the ‘dialect’. I’m from and live in the UK, though I’ve lived in various places around the world. I ‘hear’ this as a US dialect. It’s probably a kind of ‘generic’ US ‘country’ accent I’ve picked up from hanging out with US folks one way or another over the years!

      Like

  4. Good regional dialect and dialogue. This is an interesting story. Well done.

    Like

  5. Nan Falkner says:

    Good story and eerie! Thanks, Nan

    Like

  6. K.Z. says:

    i agree with janet, the voice was indeed very believable 🙂

    Like

  7. draliman says:

    Sticking to the “black’n white” seems prudent here.

    Like

  8. Amy Reese says:

    Very colorful, Ann, although I think I would stick to the black and white too. That would be so creepy to see a witch at the end of this!

    Like

  9. atrm61 says:

    “Those three be manfesashuns o t’Green Witch. Lookin’ t’carry away boys t’torture’n eat. Her persuasion’s the blue’n orange morelty.”Simply loved this line-what an impression the grandpa must have made on the lil boy’s psyche that he stuck to only black & white from then on:-)Lovely writing Ann.

    Like

  10. Dear Ann,

    Sometimes life is black and white, isn’t it? Lovely dialogue.

    It looks to me like you’ve gotten your link problems ironed out. 😉

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  11. No going there for sure. Black and white can be interesting enough without bringing dubious colours into things.

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  12. A scary place but the Grandfather seems to be a protector.

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    • AnnIsikArts says:

      Thanks Sarah. It’s what I meant. I seem to do a lot of stories where Grandad figures as the mentor/guide. My own was the only stable relationship of my childhood, so it’s not difficult to figure where this relationship stems from. Life’s a scary place! Thanks for reading. Ann

      Like

  13. Ann, your link is to an edit, not to your post. You may want to re-post and have Rochelle remove the current link. Your story has a very believable voice.

    janet

    Like

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