What I’ve Been Singing Today: The Lord’s Prayer by Andrew Hay Malotte


I returned this morning to my singing lessons after the Christmas break.  It was bad. This song is magnificent and I magnificently massacred it.

The Lord’s Prayer is a composition by Albert Hay Malotte. Malotte was born in Philadelphia in 1895 and died in Los Angeles in 1964. He was a boy scout and choir boy and when he grew up he became an organist, starting his career playing for silent movies in Chicago, then later, on the US and European concert circuit.

During the Second World War he held the rank of Captain and toured with the USO, entertaining troops in New Guinea, Australia and Europe. Aside from playing the organ, he was a pianist, composer, amateur pilot, golfer and boxer. For the majority of his working life he lived in Hollywood, composing without creditation for Disney Studios, though he won an award for his scoring for The Ugly Duckling.

The Lord’s Prayer is Malotte’s best-remembered song, though also popular with soloists is his Beatitudes and Twenty-third Psalm. He also composed oratorios, musicals and ballets.

Some of his songs include:
The Golfer’s Lament, a theme song for a TV show about golf (1946)
Treat ’em Rough, Soldier Boy! (1942)
Upstream, a setting of a 1922 poem by Carl Sandburg from
Slabs of the Sunburnt West (1937)

Slabs of the Sunburnt West?  Anyway, here’s the wonderful interpretation of this song by the wonderful Andrea Bocelli. Enjoy!

Ann

About AnnIsikArts

Artist/Writer, Proofreader/Copy Editor
This entry was posted in Music, Singing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Share your light here:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s