Friday Fictioneers 100-Word Story Challenge: The Demise of Emily Huxley


 Image 25 January 2013“Marry me?”

“World’s ending.”

“Proposal rejection 13. Novel.” Bubbles in his beer popped.  “That ocean will outlast the walls of this beach house.”

“Not for long.”

“Headlines – Palaeontologist Predicts End of World.”

“Palaeontologists Report Planet’s Final Straw.”

“Which is?”

“The demise of Emily Huxley.”

“Never met her. She died of?”

“Global warming.  Emiliania Huxleyii was a coccolithiphore.”

“Prick-teaser.”

“Globally crucial, microscopic prick-teaser.”

The walls succumbed to the ocean, the ocean to the end of the world.

“Where are we?”

“Next dimension, I suppose.”  Her voice floundered in a Babel of 7,065 billion disembodied souls.

“Now we know.”

“Life continues after death?”

“And this isn’t the first time humanity’s destroyed its planet.”

“Marry me?”

“Okay.”

“I pronounce us man and wife. Where’s the nearest wormhole?”

(c) Ann Isik 2013
Slightly more’n 100 words

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emiliania_huxleyi

About AnnIsikArts

Artist/Writer, Proofreader/Copy Editor
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51 Responses to Friday Fictioneers 100-Word Story Challenge: The Demise of Emily Huxley

  1. Some people never stop talking, even for the end of the world! I’m not sure whether this was meant as a serious global warming disaster story or a love story or just a bit of experimenting – and it could work as any or all of them – but the dialog struck me as funny, so calm and cerebral under very stressful circumstances. Nice.

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    • annisik51 says:

      I wrote a long reply to THIS and it got lost. In brief this time: yes, the global warming thing is real. Check out poor Emily Huxley on the Internet. The backstory is that the hero doesn’t know that the heroine is refusing his marriage proposals because she knows that the end of the world is coming, he doesn’t. And maybe the ‘calm and cerebral’ bit may have to do with the author’s Englishness? That ‘stiff upper lip’.

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  2. Joe Owens says:

    Love conquers all, even the apocalypse!

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  3. tedstrutz says:

    Wow… Complex piece! Especially after I found out who Emily was… Loved the title. One of those that makes you want to read the story immediately. Well done, Ann.

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    • annisik51 says:

      Thank you very much. I didn’t really understand yours. I got all mixed up with personified tricycles. But it seems you had a joke going on and it’s thrown me.

      Like

  4. deanabo says:

    Brilliant! I enjoyed this.

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  5. keliwright says:

    Very nice! Novel approach. The abrupt shifts in the story really work in this to reinforce the concept of dimension jumping.

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  6. love your last two lines!

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  7. Hi Ann,
    Wildly imaginative take on the photo. Liked the environmental theme, and extending the story into the netherworld. Ron

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    • annisik51 says:

      Your story ending was unexpected and funny too. I just looked up Ozack as I’d not heard the word before. You live in a fabulous part of the US! Such history. And nature. I recognise your name as English, but learn that it’s also French.

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  8. yerpirate says:

    True originality, excellent pace – mysterious…and yes, needs awareness and braincells to read – I like that.

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  9. At the end of the world there’s a worm hole of love 🙂 very nice

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  10. Interesting. Enjoyed the writing. Reminded me of, “Waiting for Godot.”

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  11. So what you’re saying is that they have a planktonic relationship? Nice dialogue. Thanks for the link.
    Shalom,
    Rochelle

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    • annisik51 says:

      Ouch! But very witty! By the way, when I suggested you answer your phone if it rings, but have a PRIEST standing by, I ought really to have said RABBI. Hope my stupidity didn’t cause any offence! Me and my mouf! That phone is proving a good advertising prop. I’ll have to buy your book now. Ann

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  12. Sandra says:

    Truly original. Great take on the prompt.

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    • annisik51 says:

      Thanks a lot Sandra! I saw, when visiting your site, that you sail in France. We lived in France for 11 years. Husband’s involved in the marine industry. Returned to UK in 2010. We’re doing up a boat (Albin Vega). Ann

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  13. nightlake says:

    This is a very different attempt..and a very good one. enjoyed reading this:)

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  14. Had to look up “coccolithiphore” so it was a good day to learn something new. 🙂 I liked your line about her voice floundering in a Babel of voice.

    janet

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  15. rich says:

    please help me out. not totally sure what this line means: “The sea outlasted the walls. Not for long.” seems like it means that ocean dried up. not sure.

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    • annisik51 says:

      The sea endured longer than the walls of the beach house. But not for long, for the end of the world arrived and thus the sea, along with everything else, succumbed. But yes, this construction is a bit ‘dodgy’ and you picked up on this. Thank you. You are a wordsmith sans pareil! Thanks for your insight.

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      • rich says:

        oh, okay. i see what you mean. the walls fell, the seas endured, but the seas eventually “fell” also. thanks. and thanks for the nice compliment.

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      • annisik51 says:

        That you had to ask for an explanation could mean/probably means my writing at that point needs sharper editing. This weekly project is proving to be very good discipline. I never thought I’d be able to write a whole story, in 100 words, within quite a short time span. And get free editing. And I’ve written two stories now. And each could be expanded. It gives me hope that I will finish my big fat novel.

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      • rich says:

        that’s why i do this. great editing exercise. and i wouldn’t say you didn’t write it well. i maybe didn’t read carefully enough. but i knew something was up.

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      • annisik51 says:

        I’ve been reading some of your work while researching how to make liver of sulphur. Is there a connection? Perhaps, in the ‘autobiographical’ which is chilling, grilling and fixating. If I had a fiver for every time I’d been persecuted … Entered the New Yorker cartoon caption competition. Wish me luck! Will ‘they’ understand Ye Olde English Humour with a ‘u’? Thanks again for reading.

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  16. elmowrites says:

    Definitely an interesting take on the prompt, Ann. I like the repetition and the little lesson about photoplankton. I was reading about them and their links to global warming only recently! I love what you did with the name.
    If I could give one critique, it would be that the dialogue feels a bit rushed at the beginning. As you include narration later on, a line of narration or attribution at the start might help break it up. Just a suggestion.

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    • annisik51 says:

      Yes. Without the word constraint (which I overran anyway) I would try for greater variety of expression. ‘Talking heads’ have to do better ‘talking’ than I’ve employed. Each line of dialogue, a jewel in itself. Thanks for the feedback. Much appreciated.

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  17. Tom Poet says:

    I would love to say I am going to steal your style but I think you are too smart for me…hard to beat witty conversation no matter what dimension you are in…
    Tom

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    • annisik51 says:

      You’re certainly wrong about the smart thing. And do you know, I have found dialogue the most difficult aspect of writing? So ‘talking heads’ is good practise for me. Though not really planned. The story just arrived.

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  18. Joyce says:

    That is quite a bit different than my real life story. 🙂 I guess in the world of sci-fi this could be one of those moments when the world comes to a crashing end, or disintegrates into the atmosphere? I have a hard time understanding a lot of plots i sci-fi but they are very popular I know. Thank you very much for the positive comments and visit and reading of my blog post and story. I appreciate all that come in. My very best to you in your writing and art. Your art is very interesting too and pretty.

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  19. Even when the world ends love prevails. Nice take on prompt.

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