Taking a Preposition for a Walk II: ‘Walking Towards’


‘Walking towards’ feels, as an action, to be walking with more force, purpose and goal than ‘walking to’.  Here’s what I came up with when I did an Internet search using just the words, ‘walking towards’. 

Walking towards the Games  is a site about free guided walks  (London’s ‘Strategic Walk Network) with the aim of making London one of the most walking friendly cities in Europe by 2012, when London will be hosting the 2012 Olympic Games.   The walks “… connect some of London’s best attractions, parks, woodlands, rivers and open spaces”.  Nine out of forty London walks are flagged as ‘Walking towards the Games’ when walkers will see how easy it will be to walk to the Olympic site. 

The Lee Valley Walk is described as forming the central spine along the Olympic Park, providing important links into and across the valley, while The Thames Path Walk at Woolwich (Olympic shooting events will be hosted at Woolwich’s Royal Arsenal) will be of interest to shooting enthusiasts. The Jubilee Greenway Walk, designed by the Jubilee Walkway Trust to celebrate HM the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012 is a 60km route connecting all the London venues for the Games.

The reasons for the Ancient Olympic Games, held in Olympia, Greece between 8th century BC and 5th century AD, are unknown. They were then, as now, competitive events between various kingdoms of Ancient Greece.  Perhaps they were politically motivated. Are today’s Olympic Games motivated similarly and in addition by money?  In part, yes, I think, but hopefully revenues will go towards encouraging and enabling a healthier lifestyle.

… walking towards Winchester … appears in the body of an article on the ‘Footprints Walking Holidays’ web site at ‘Footprints of Sussex’. It is about the South Down Way, “… a delightful 100 mile (160 km) National Trail along the south coast of England, through beautiful countryside in the South Downs National Park”.  Mid-way along the trail is the medieval town of Steyning where  ‘Footprints of Sussex’ is situated. If my memory serves me well, I dine once in Steyning with friends. I recall distinctly my very rare (almost raw) bloody steak. This was about 20 years before I became a vegetarian. As I remember nothing about the place except this steak swimming in the blood of the poor ‘boeuf’ who gave up his life for me, perhaps it was the first stirrings of my conscience in respect of food and animals!

Walking Towards Death  is a link to an article in the Sun newspaper. It begins:  “An anorexic woman who walked 12 hours a day to slash her weight to three stone has battled back to health”.  The subject of the article walked 30 miles of streets daily, from 6 am to 6pm, which led eventually to her hospitalisation, on the brink of death.

While this appears under the heading of ‘walking towards’ , clearly this is a ‘walking away’ activity. It seems, happily, that Ms … discovered what it was she was trying to walk away from. The article gives food for thought.  The act of walking is healthy practice, but only if combined with healthy motivation. 

Walking towards … mankind.  Tiktaalik roseae is the name of a fossil fish, known as the ‘fishapod’. It was discovered by scientists in 2006 on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic. Said to be 375 million years old, its importance lies in the light it sheds on “…a pivotal point in the history of life on Earth: when the very first fish ventured out onto land”.  (Creationists might well argue against these findings).

Two important questions to consider, perhaps, from ‘Walking towards’: 

What motivates you to walk?
Is it a healthy motivation?

Ann Isik
www.annisik.com

http://www.london2012.com
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/static/corporate/media/newscentre/archive/12605.html
http://www.footprintsofsussex.co.uk
http://www.thesun.co.uk
http://tiktaalik.uchicago.edu

About AnnIsikArts

Artist/Writer, Proofreader/Copy Editor
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